Let’s Plant Trees

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Trees add value to your property and heal the environment

How can we help combat climate change by planning now in January?

Although planting trees won’t stop Climate Change, trees will help to counteract carbon emissions through carbon absorption. Trees serve as the lungs of the planet and of our cities. The City of Toronto aims to increase its tree canopy because it recognizes the significant environmental and community benefits of urban forests. The plan is to plant about 10 million trees by 2050. That’s a lot of trees.

The City will be looking at converting surplus City lands into green spaces and replenishing or modifying streetscapes and city parks. But the majority of the tree planting will come from private land owners and a push is on to to get residents on board. The whole of Roncesvalles Village has seen an increase in the planting of City trees along our streets and it is hoped that land owners will continue planting trees on their properties.

If you have an unobscured space that’s 3 metres by 3 metres, you can plant a tree. Non-profit organizations like LEAF can offer care giving tips and subsidize costs. By re-imagining yard spaces as mini forests with trees and native shrubs, we can increase the value of our homes, outdoor pleasures and help contribute to the health of our community. 

Now’s the time to plan your spring plantings.

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Reimagine your yard as a native treed forest

The City would be a better place with lush plantings, but plan with knowledge and consideration. 

Some kind of an Ethics Policy ought to be established to promote respectful planting. Just as we see people who claim “Natural Garden Exemptions” — in lieu of properly caring for their property — there are those who plant with disregard; such as planting masses of trees along or too closely to property lines without regard to — or even to spite — their neighbours or who plant invasive species like Japanese Knotweed, which is detrimental. Toronto courts have been known to award ownership rights to both parties who share a tree canopy, and programs are being developed to educate people about the problems with non-native plant species, including tips on how to avoid root damage to house foundations. 

It takes a decade to grow a tree into maturity and we simply can’t go back in time. To leave a legacy to the future residents of our community, we must pay it forward now.  

Enjoy dreaming and planning your tree-scape during these winter months.

Want to get involved?

Community Meeting: Making Toronto a Climate Change Leader

Join Ward 13 Councillor Sarah Doucette and Ward 14 Councillor Gord Perks to share your ideas to help Toronto reduce its greenhouse gas emissions and adapt to one of the biggest ecological crises of our time, climate change.This event is part of the Talk Transformation! conversations happening throughout the city.

 

Wednesday, January 27th
7:00 PM – 9:00 PM
Bishop Marrocco/Thomas Merton School
1515 Bloor St West at Dundas, 3rd floor Staff Room

LINK~  RSVP to attend

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Leave your Leaves

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Clear only traffic areas of leaf debris

Clear your gutters, street drains and traffic areas of leaf debris but consider leaving your Autumn leaves in landscaped beds and mulched leaves on lawns.

Scientists world wide are urging home owners to adopt a more eco approach to how we can help create sustainable habitats for wee creatures like butterflies and beneficial insects and also, manufacturer our own healthy soil amendments.   Left alone in garden areas, leaves decompose with the assistance of little creatures and fungi – eventually the process turns the leafy accumulation into humous rich, earthy leaf mould & compost.  Besides, the insulating qualities of any blanketed organic matter, are known to protect and save delicate shrubs and perennials. Toronto winters get cold.

Depleting the earth of its own potential goodness is like removing important bacterial flora from our own bodies.  It just has to be replaced synthetically – use the real thing!

Throughout America, the National Wildlife Federation is campaigning the merits against over meticulous environmental care. We as RoncyWorks members and Roncesvalles area neighbours, ought to recognize such leaf saving benefits by supporting leaf – non collection strategies ourselves because such action plans are pro supportive towards Environmental Protection.

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View large expanses of leaves – differently

Save your Back, save a Buck! 

It goes without saying; less raking reduces the risk of muscular injury.  But saving a buck?  Imagine never having to purchase fertilizer, bags of garden loam or mulch again.  By contributing to your own manufacturing of leaf mould, you will always have an economical abundance of nature’s bounty. That saves you money.   Many savvy gardeners are utilizing the benefits of autumn leaves.  Some use their lawnmowers or weed wackers to mulch leaves down so that they decompose faster. Left finely chopped on lawns, they deteriorate quickly and tend not to blow around.   Some collect surplus leaves in an uncovered bin and wait for the process of time to do its work. Its really quite easy. I personally have raked my leaves onto my landscaped flower beds for years, every spring I note how much better the earth has become. 

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Make your own Leaf Mould & Yard Compost

If binned home leaf composting  isn’t your thing, rely on The City of Toronto’s leaf collecting system but do it in the Spring after you, your garden and the insects have  benefitted.

Think of life in forests.  No one rakes the accumulation of leaves, yet every spring decomposition has occurred because of the presence of beneficial fungi, insect life and the blanketing of snow.  As new growth pushes through the leafy floor,  the remainder of fallen leaves provide a rich mulch, that eventually breaks down and that process,  is a never ending natural cycle. – now take the forest example and apply it to your own garden. It’s simple, easy and free.

Roncy Earth Hour Candlelight Walk 2014

Roncesvalles Village celebrates its 5th Annual Earth Hour Candlelight Walk

People from the Roncesvalles Village dressed in winter coats share the light of their candles at the end of their Earth Hour walk down Roncesvalles Avenue.

Earth Hour Candlelight Walk participants are part of a world-wide effort to raise awareness of our energy intensive lifestyle’s impact on the planet’s ecosystem.

Acknowledging the 7th Annual Global Earth Hour, residents of Roncesvalles Village and surrounding area will walk together as a symbolic gesture in support of the need for environmental stewardship. At 8:30 p.m. on Saturday March 29th 2014, a candlelight walk is scheduled to start along Roncesvalles Avenue. The walk will end at Grafton Park near Queens Street West around 9 p.m.  Continue reading