Learn about Japanese Knotweed

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Japanese Knotweed growing through foundation

Japanese Knotweed is an invasive, destructive plant that is banned in Britain.  It’s presence through out England, decreases property values and it has now become illegal to deal with its removal on your own, government intervention is actually required.

CBC’s the Current  & MACLEAN’S magazine have both reported about epic outbreaks in British Columbia. Ontario’s Invading Species organization actually has a hotline to report outbreaks of this tenacious plant that is damaging massive treks of rural areas as it upsets the eco system by overgrowth.  It isn’t a native plant. 

The City of Toronto lists and provides information for residents to identify and eradicate Japanese Knotweed because the plant is capable of growing through building foundations and breaking through concrete and asphalt. Having it near your home can actually affect the resale of your house. 

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Coming up tenaciously

RoncyWorks members wish to help inform residents of the Roncesvalles area because it has been spotted throughout the region. Most seasoned gardeners know about it, but every once and awhile a novice gardener will come across it and be charmed by it’s attractiveness. Many people think it is a bamboo of some kind.

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Novice gardener plants unknowingly

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Sprays of flowers in late summer

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Easily confused with Bamboo

The best way to get rid of it – is surface removal and destruction from leaf down or the use of herbicides. Digging up the ground and breaking the root system, actually encourages it to regrow into multiple plants.

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Plants may need to be eradicated with herbicides

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2 thoughts on “Learn about Japanese Knotweed

  1. Pingback: Urban Gardening: Growing plants together | RoncyWorks

  2. I have this in my backyard on Sorauren near Geoffrey! I’ve seen it for like 3 years and have taken it down every fall. This year, after seeing this article, we took it down right away. Terribly difficult to get rid of.

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